SME DEVELOPMENT, ECONOMIC GROWTH AND STRUCTURAL CHANGE EVIDENCE FROM GHANA AND SOUTH AFRICA

Main Article Content

Natalia Tsatsenko

Abstract

This paper raises the question of how the SME development can be embedded into the process of structural change and highlights the linkages between various transformations processes aimed at enhancing the role of SMEs in two countries in the Sub-Saharan African region as a new growth opportunity. Under rapidly changing economic conditions, it is expected that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) may have a potential contribution to the economy. To the understanding of the interaction between SMEs, structural change and economic growth, this paper explores the nature of SME development, the nature of structural change and the process of economic growth in Ghana and South Africa based on country-study. Moreover, the development of the SME in the context of private sector development is described through SME-policy.

Article Details

How to Cite
TSATSENKO, Natalia. SME DEVELOPMENT, ECONOMIC GROWTH AND STRUCTURAL CHANGE. Journal of Agriculture and Environment, [S.l.], n. 2 (14), june 2020. ISSN 2564-890X. Available at: <http://jae.cifra.science/article/view/211>. Date accessed: 30 sep. 2020. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.23649/jae.2020.2.14.7.
Section
Economy agribusiness and agriculture, rural sociology
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